Rocket poles were once a fairly common site around the coast of Britain and were associated with training for a system of rocket launched life-saving equipment. These would be used to fire a line to a stranded ship which could then be used to winch survivors ashore. A shed was constructed in the village in 1893 to store the equipment.

Near the pole is a rectangular pond, created by test digging for granite at the time the of the Old Light's construction. The pond contains a population of carp, of unknown origin, who appear to thrive despite an apparent lack of food.

There are currently about 480 members of the Lundy Field Society, mostly in Britain but with others around the world. The society meets annually at its AGM which is usually held in Crediton, near Exeter, at the beginning of March. As well as society business there are talks on recent work on the island and an opportunity to meet other members.

Members often also meet on the island.

New members are always welcome - you can join here.

The LFS produces three publications which are distributed to members, a Newsletter in February, the Annual Report in the autumn and the Journal containing longer academic papers. The Journal is produced annually or biennially depending on contributions. The LFS promotes and publishes research on the island and members also carry out conservation-related work on the island.

If you have something to contribute, please contact the relevant editor.

Latest news

You are invited to attend the Annual General Meeting of the Society at The Boniface Centre, Crediton, EX17 2AH on Saturday 14th March 2020 from 12 noon. See here for directions. We hope you will be able to join us to renew friendships and meet other members of the Society.

Papers for the AGM will be available to download from here when ready.

Peter Davis, Lundy Warden in the early 1950s has passed away at the age of 91. He was the author of the green 'A List of the Birds of Lundy' booklet which the LFS published in 1954. You may be familiar with it as a copy resides on the library shelves in each property on Lundy and in the Tavern. As with many other Lundy wardens, he went on to have a distinguished career in ornithology. A full obituary can be read here.

On a cold and blustery day in November, 14 curious stayers joined our new Assistant Warden Rosie, John Hedger and myself, to learn more about fungi. Starting in the warmth of the tavern, John explained how the wet conditions this year have resulted in huge numbers of fungi of all shapes, sizes, and colours to appear all over the island, making it the best year for records for about 13 years. After an interesting introduction to their life cycle and biology, we headed out to find some examples. Passing through the Camping Field into Lighthouse Field, we were greeted by dots of colour as far as the eye could see – the waxcaps were out in force.

 

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